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100% accuracy at time of writing cannot be guaranteed.  A listing in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and does not mean it is an endorsement.  All companies listed are tried at the reader’s own risk.  All information provided is intended as a supplement to any professional help already

given.  Before acting on suggestions from anyone, ostomates are advised to check with a doctor or stoma care nurse that the course of action is suitable

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GLOSSARY

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JEJUNOSTOMY


A jejunostomy is an opening into the jejunum, the portion of the small bowel after the duodenum

and before the ileum.


JEJUNUM


Jejunum is the middle section of the small intestine between the duodenum and the ileum.


J-POUCH


See Ileoanal Reservoir.








KARAYA


Karaya is a water-soluble, gummy substance from the bark of a tree.  It is used for healing or preventing damage to skin.  It comes in gelatinous sheets, powder or paste, and can be used as a

skin barrier for protecting the skin around a stoma.


KOCK POUCH


See Continent Ileostomy and Continent Urostomy.








LACERATIONS


Lacerations refer to a cut or tear to the stoma, usually due to friction from the stoma appliance, or they may develop in conjunction with trauma to the stoma.  Usually, they appear as a yellow to white linear discolouration of the stoma mucosa.


It can be severe enough to penetrate or fistulate the bowel wall, but is commonly superficial.  A stoma does not possess any nerve endings, and therefore the patient may not experience any pain.


LACTASE


Lactase is an enzyme in the small intestine, which is needed to digest milk sugar (lactose).


LACTOSE INTOLERANCE


Lactose intolerance is the act of not being able to digest lactose, a sugar present in milk.  This condition occurs because the body does not produce the lactase enzyme.


LAPAROSCOPY


A laparoscopy is a ‘key-hole’ surgical procedure, in which a thin, lighted tube (laparoscope) is inserted, allowing the surgeon to see inside the body.


LAPAROTOMY


This is a surgical procedure involving an incision through the abdominal wall to gain access into the abdominal cavity.  It is also known as coeliotomy.  It is performed either as exploratory surgery, or as the first step in an abdominal operation.


LARGE INTESTINE


The large intestine, also known as the colon, is the last part of the digestive system, which goes from

the caecum to the rectum.  It is primarily responsible for the body’s absorption of fluid (changing liquid

to a solid form) and electrolytes, storage of food wastes, and transport of the stool.  The large intestine is five feet long, and includes the appendix, caecum, colon and rectum.


LAZY COLON


See Atonic Colon.


LEAKAGE


Leakage from an ill-fitting pouch can cause sore skin around the stoma.  Therefore, it is important to make sure the skin around a stoma is dry, before fitting a pouch.  Creases may be filled with a stoma paste.   In addition, rings and washers may help to give a really good seal around the stoma.


LOOP COLOSTOMY


A loop colostomy is usually created in the transverse colon, commonly used to temporarily divert faeces from the distal colon.  It is one stoma with two openings – one discharges stool, the second discharges mucous.


LOOP ILEOSTOMY


A loop ileostomy is usually a temporary ileostomy, where a loop of small intestine is pulled through the abdominal wall to create a stoma.


A loop ileostomy is also sometimes used in the construction of ileoanal reservoirs.  Ileoanal pouches are internal pouches that are surgically constructed from the small intestine.  The pouches are constructed for people, who need to have their colon and rectum removed.  The pouch is then connected to the sphincter muscle, which is the muscle that surrounds the anus.  Once the surgery is complete, it is important that the pouch remains free of waste materials for a few weeks, so that it can heal.  Therefore, the loop ileostomy allows waste to pass through the stoma, without affecting the pouch.  Once the pouch is healed, the small intestine is connected to the pouch, allowing the stoma to heal.


LOOP OSTOMY


A loop ostomy is one type of stoma, usually for a temporary ostomy.  The transverse colon is brought through the abdominal wall to form a stoma.  For several days, a plastic rod or ‘bridge’ of tissue from the body, under the loop, keeps it from falling back into the abdomen.  The loop is opened to create a single stoma with two openings.  One opening is still connected to the food-digesting intestinal tract, and it continues to discharge stool.  The other opening may discharge a small amount of mucous.


LOWER GI SERIES


Lower GI Series are x-rays of the rectum, colon and lower part of the small intestine.  A barium enema

is given first.  Barium coats the organs so that they will show up on the x-ray.  It is also called a barium enema x-ray.








MACERATION


Maceration is peristomal skin, which is excoriated and moist.


MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING


Magnetic resonance imaging is an imaging test, which uses ‘magnetic resonance’ to give a cross-sectional picture of the internal body structures, and can take pictures of the soft tissues in the body.  

It can be used to show the urinary tract and the non-moving structures in the abdomen.  For the patient, it involves lying still inside a large tube.


MEGACOLON


Megacolon is a huge, swollen colon, resulting from severe constipation.


MITROFANOFF PROCEDURE


Mitrofanoff is a surgical procedure to create a continent channel/conduit (for catheterisation) between the skin and either the bladder or a urinary reservoir, either using the appendix or ‘Monti’ (ileum). This is likely to be done in conjunction with another procedure.  Self-catheterisation via the Mitrofanoff is necessary to empty the bladder.


MRI


See Magnetic Resonance Imaging.


MUCOSA


Mucosa is moist tissue, which lines certain parts of the inside of the body, including the nose, mouth, lungs and the urinary and digestive tracts.  Glands in the mucosa release a thick fluid called mucous.


MUCOSAL LINING


Mucosal lining is the lining of the GI tract organs, which makes mucous.


MUCOUS


Mucous is naturally produced by the intestines, and secreted by glands lining the bowel wall.  Its function is to act as a barrier and to lubricate the passage of stool.  It may be seen in the discharge of a colostomy or urostomy, and can give the stoma a shiny appearance.


It is usually a clear, viscous fluid, which may contain enzymes, and coats and protects tissues in the GI tract.  The quantity, which is produced, will increase if inflammation and/or infection are present.


MUCOUS COLITIS


See Irritable Bowel Syndrome.


MUCOUS FISTULA


A mucous fistula is the non-working stoma in a loop ileostomy.  The mucous fistula can be the second

of two stomas in a temporary ostomy, or the second opening in a single loop ostomy stoma.  It may discharge some mucous.